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Skin Cancer Awareness

Here are two main types of skin cancers: Melanoma and Nonmelanoma. Within that, about 90% of non-melanoma and 85% of melanoma cancers are associated with UV radiation exposure from the sun. The sun’s UV rays can damage unprotected skin in as little as 15 minutes.


May 12, 2021 7:00:00 AM / by Whitney Dickerson



How we can prevent and protect ourselves

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month. With over 5 million cases diagnosed each year, Skin Cancer is the most common cancer and one of the most preventable. The biggest question to ask yourself and to your clients is, “Do you wear protection?” Which includes protective clothing, seeking shade, and wearing your SPF to reduce your risk. This is essential to preventing detrimental damage to your skin. Some facts from Skin cancer | Causes, Symptoms & Treatments | Cancer Council

  • The two leading causes of skin cancer are the sun’s harmful ray’s and the use of tanning beds

  • When detected early, the 5-year survival rate for melanoma is 99%

  • Your risk for melanoma doubles if you’ve had more than five sunburns

  • 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer by the age of 70

  • An estimated 207,390 cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in 2021

  • While it is infrequent, Ocular Melanoma is the most common eye cancer in adults

  • Musician Bob Marley was diagnosed with acral lentiginous melanoma, which ultimately claimed his life at the young age of 36

There are two main types of skin cancers: Melanoma and Nonmelanoma. Within that, about 90% of non-melanoma and 85% of melanoma cancers are associated with UV radiation exposure from the sun. The sun’s UV rays can damage unprotected skin in as little as 15 minutes. Melanoma: is a dangerous form of skin cancer. It accounts for only 1% of skin cancers, but it is the leading cause of death related to this disease. Non-Melanoma: cases can often be much less life-threatening and usually easier to treat, especially when caught early. There are two types of non-melanoma, which include Basal Cell Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Simple things to keep in your bag or car for protection:

  • A lightweight long-sleeved shirt or cover-up

  • A hat with a wide brim that helps shade your face, ears, head, and neck

  • Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays

  • Sunscreen with Spf 15-30 that has both UVA and UVB protection

Early detection is entirely possible with keeping to the following guidelines:

  1. Monthly Self Exam

Here’s what you’ll need: a bright light, a full-length mirror, a hand mirror, two chairs or stools, and a blow-dryer. (Steps provided by https://thebigsee.org/#self-exam)

  • Examine your face: especially your nose, lips, mouth, and ears, front and both. Use one of both mirrors to get a clear view.

  • Inspect your scalp: thoroughly inspect your scalp using a blow-dryer and mirror to expose each section to view. Get a friend or family member to help if possible.

  • Check your hands: palms and backs, between the fingers and under the fingernails. Continue up the wrists to examine both the front and back of your forearms.

  • Scan your arms: standing in front of the full-length mirror, begin at the elbows and scan all sides of your upper arms. Don’t forget the underarms.

  • Next, focus on the neck, chest, and torso. Women should lift breasts to view the undersides.

  • Scan upper back: with our back to the full-length mirror, use the hand mirror to inspect the back of your neck, shoulders, upper back, and any part of the back of your upper arms you couldn’t view in the above arm step.

  • Using both mirrors, scan your lower back, buttocks, and backs of both legs.

  • Sit down, prop each leg in turn on the other stool or chair. Use the mirror to examine the genitals. Check the front and sides of both legs, thigh to shin, ankles, tops of feet, between toes, and under toenails. Also, examine the soles of your feet and heels.

  • If you see something NEW, CHANGING, or UNUSUAL, get it checked out right away!

  1. Yearly Clinical Skin Exam

ABCDE guidelines on what to look for: A is for Asymmetry: The diameter is not an even shape, or one half of the mole does not match the other. B is for Border: The edges are not smooth and are irregular or ragged C is for Color: color varies, may include shades of brown, black, pink, red, white, or blue D is for Diameter: The spot is larger than 6 mm across (the size of a pencil eraser), although smaller is possible E is for Evolving: The spot or mole is changing in size, shape, or color GlyMed Plus has numerous options for SPF to help you and your clients stay safe. Make sure you are following these guidelines and staying consistent to prevent burns or damage. Don’t forget to keep hydrated and protected from the sun!


If you have any questions and would like to speak to one of our friendly Master Aestheticians in your area, please email support@glymedplusaustralia.com.au

Written by Whitney Dickerson



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